Jetpack CDN controls and customization - coder at laptop

Jetpack Hooks: Control Jetpack CDN

Note: We wrote this article with advanced users in mind; you’ll need some coding knowledge to accomplish these tasks. As always, enable Jetpack Backup so you can easily revert your site in case of a mistake. Hooks are a way for one piece of code to interact with or modify another piece of code. They make up the foundation for how Jetpack interacts with WordPress Core.

If you have questions about how to use these yourself, ask the Jetpack community in the forums. If you’d like to hire help, reach out to a service like Codeable

Continue reading → Jetpack Hooks: Control Jetpack CDN

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Why You Need a CDN for WordPress and How to Set One Up

Speed and reliability are undeniable priorities for any website: 47% of customers expect online stores to load in less than two seconds, and a one-second delay in load time reduces page views by 11%. This has a real impact on your business!

While there are a variety of ways to improve website speed, a content delivery network (CDN) should be one of your first considerations.

Continue reading → Why You Need a CDN for WordPress and How to Set One Up

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Why Your WordPress Website is Slow (and How to Fix it Fast)

Slow websites lead to lost traffic and revenue. According to Pingdom, load times are directly correlated with bounce rate — the percentage of people who leave your website without visiting more than one page.

More and more people browse the internet on mobile devices, which often have less-reliable internet connections. And not everyone lives in an area with good connectivity. If your website’s load time is long, you’re inaccessible to them.

Continue reading → Why Your WordPress Website is Slow (and How to Fix it Fast)

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Accelerate Your Site and SEO With Jetpack

An illustration of a site loading quickly with Jetpack

Regardless of the type of site you’re running, making sure that it loads quickly and feels fast should be among of your primary goals.

A fast site means a better visitor experience. Shorter load times can lead to lower bounce rates, happier readers, more page views, a healthier Time on Page, and — if you’re running a store — improved sales.

Because Google uses site speed in its ranking algorithm, it also has a direct influence on your SEO. Fast load times can result in higher rankings and ultimately lead to increased organic traffic.

Jetpack’s new site accelerator can improve your site speed and help you take control of your SEO. This new feature, similar to our Image CDN, allows you to host static site assets — such as JavaScript files and CSS stylesheets — on Jetpack’s servers and serve them from our own Content Delivery Network (CDN). This means less stress on your servers and an improved browsing experience for your visitors.

Currently, only files included in WordPress core and the Jetpack plugin can be served by our CDN.

Ready to take your new site accelerator for a spin?

Go to Jetpack Settings Writing in the dashboard of your WordPress site and toggle the Enable site accelerator option found in the Performance & speed section. No additional configuration or set up is necessary.

We’d love to hear from you

Enable the new site accelerator for your sites and let us know if you have any feedback — we’d love to hear it! Please leave a comment below or open an issue in our GitHub repository.

Posted in Features, Jetpack News, Performance, Search Engine Optimization | 24 Comments
data examining Jetpacks plugin: image of cables

Is Jetpack Bloated? More Data that Debunks the Myth

This article was originally published on the BruteProtect blog. BruteProtect was a plugin designed to stop malicious IPs from accessing WordPress websites. The technology behind BruteProtect is now part of Jetpack’s security features, protecting millions of website from brute force attacks every day.


Thanks for all the feedback and shares on Part 1, see that post for more info on which modules in Jetpack are activated by default and which “Other” plugins we used to test against.

There have been a number of requests for us to show what WordPress core (with no plugins) and Jetpack activated but all modules deactivated looks like, so here we go.

Note that all of the numbers have changed a bit because we re-ran all tests from scratch with an updated version of WebPageTest.

 Other PluginsJetpack (with default modules)Jetpack (with no modules)WordPress Core, no plugins
First load, TTFB1103ms569ms470ms408ms
First load, Fully loaded2742ms1970ms1756ms1620ms
Jetpack vs. WordPress Core without Plugins
Jetpack timing tests
Jetpack Benchmark Assets
Jetmark Benchmark Visual Load
Jetpack Benchmark Bytes

About our testing methodology:
Tests were run from a private instance of WebPageTest, run from an EC2 instance within 1ms of our test subject server. Each test was run 27 times, and we used the median score for each factor. The test server had no other traffic on it while these tests were being performed.


Still have questions about the Jetpack plugin? Contact support or search documentation for quick answers.

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