Restoring a Jetpack Backup

What to Do If Your Site is Down

If you’re reading this, it’s probably because your site is down and you want to restore it to working order as quickly as possible.

Before looking at restore options, it’s worth considering whether a restore is actually the best solution! It’s possible that your site could be brought back online quickly without resorting to waiting for a restore to complete.

Retrace Your Steps

Are you aware of any recent changes you made on the site that might have caused the problem? For example, if you recently installed a plugin, it may have had an error or conflict upon activation that caused the site to go down.

You can review the site’s Activity Log to check for any recent changes that may have created the issue.

If you suspect that a plugin is the cause, you can deactivate that plugin via FTP access or your webhost’s file manager by changing the name of the plugin’s folder inside the /wp-content/plugins/ directory on your server – Your host can help you with that if need be.

If you’re not sure whether a plugin is actually to blame, it’s worth testing by deactivating all plugins. If that brings the site back online, then you can try activating each plugin one by one until the site goes down again to determine which one is making trouble.

Nervous about deactivating plugins on your live site when testing? Feel free to try out the Health Check & Troubleshooting plugin to create a special session only for you (as a logged-in user) where it starts you off with plugins disabled and a minimal theme applied.

Do You See Any Error Messages?

When a site is down, it will usually display an error message that can provide a clue as to how to fix it. If you see an error message on the site, check if the error is mentioned on this list of common WordPress errors. If so, follow the guide to see if you can remove the error. If you can’t fix it, definitely copy the error and paste it somewhere or take a screenshot to reference later if you have to.

If you see nothing but a blank screen, that may be what’s known as the ‘White Screen of Death’ (WSOD). In this case, you can follow this guide to try and bring the site back.

Did You Receive an Email Alerting You to a Security Threat?

If you received an email letting you know that Jetpack identified a potential threat on your site prior to your site going down, or if you suspect your site has been hacked, you can follow this guide to secure your site, eliminating possible malware issues and strengthening your site for the future.

Contact Your Host

The last thing to try before restoring the site would be to contact your webhost for assistance. They have direct control over your site and server and can check their error logs to find the exact cause of the issue. They can most likely fix the problem for you or at least point you in the next best direction.

If You Need to Restore

Jetpack may still able to restore your site, even if it’s down, as long as the site has a working WordPress installation, and you’ve added working server credentials. You have two options to restore:

  1. (Automatic) Perform a restore of one of your restore points mentioned in your Activity Log as shown here
  2. (Advanced) Download a backup and re-upload it to a server manually as instructed in this guide

If you need help determining the best course of action, feel free to ask Jetpack Support for guidance.

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Troubleshooting Jetpack VaultPress Backup

Having trouble making backups? Learn some basic troubleshooting steps you can take to fix backup issues.

Check the Site’s Jetpack Connection

A working Jetpack connection is required to get Jetpack VaultPress Backup working properly. Before attempting any other troubleshooting steps, make sure your site’s Jetpack connection is working.

The Jetpack connection is used to facilitate backups of your site. There are times when the connection can become unstable or broken. This may be due to a misconfiguration of your site or hosting.

The first thing to do is check the connection status using the Jetpack Debug page. If it reports any issues with the connection, please see the Fixing Jetpack Connection Issues guide.

  1. Check your site’s connection on the Jetpack Debug page.
  2. Troubleshoot the connection using the Fixing Jetpack Connection Issues guide.

Add Server Credentials

Once the Jetpack connection is working, that should be enough for backups to start working again. In some situations, your site may still run into errors. In that case, the next step is to add server credentials.

An added bonus to adding server credentials is that backups are more efficient, and you are set to perform site restores in the event that you ever need one. Adding the credentials is done differently depending on which Jetpack plugin you’re using. See these guides for more information:

Check File Permissions

Ensure your SFTP/SSH/FTP credentials have full read and write file permissions to the files listed on your Backup Warnings list.

After fixing the issue, you can wait for the new backup to run the next day, or trigger a new backup by clicking the ‘Retry’ button on your Backup page.

Transients errors

You can fix transient file errors by adding a donotbackup folder and moving the files listed on your Backup Warnings list to this folder.

After fixing the issue, you can wait for the new backup to run the next day, or trigger a new backup by clicking the ‘Retry’ button on your Backup page.

Database errors

Ensure your database credentials have proper access to your database and your tables are not corrupt.

After fixing the issue, you can wait for the new backup to run the next day, or trigger a new backup by clicking the ‘Retry’ button on your Backup page.

Review Security and Proxy Settings

Even with a working Jetpack connection and server credentials, we can still see failed backups.

An example would be a proxy service like Cloudflare blocking SSH/FTP connections or a security plugin like Wordfence blocking certain network requests.

If you are comfortable, feel free to review and customize these settings. If not, we recommend temporarily disabling these services/features while troubleshooting your backups.

Generally, this can be achieved by disabling the plugin but you might also have to disable a feature in the service providers dashboard (ie: pausing Cloudflare from their dashboard).

Speak to Your Host

Even when everything has been set up correctly it’s still possible to see errors. This is usually due to security settings outside your control.

Examples of this would be hosts who run ModSecurity at a level above what the hosting control panel exposes.

Often this type of security is automated and kicks in temporarily when the server sees repeated requests from a certain IP or too many requests in a given window of time.

The best way to get around this is to have your host allowlist Jetpack. You can direct them to our Hosting Reference Documentation page for the necessary details. See the section titled, “Allowlist IPs”.

If you are not sure about who your site is hosted with you can check using WhoIsHostingThis.com.

Some security and firewall plugins may also block requests from Jetpack; adding the same IP ranges to these plugins may be required. You could also try temporarily disabling other plugins to determine which may be blocking requests.

No Longer Need Backups?

If your plans for your site have changed and you no longer need backups, you can cancel your Jetpack plan so you won’t receive these emails anymore.

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

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Cloning/Migrating a Site

Cloning allows you to use Jetpack VaultPress Backup to migrate your site to a fresh WordPress installed on any host.

The cloning feature is helpful when you are moving your site to a new host or if you want to create a copy of your site to use for testing and development.

Before you start

Your source site (the current live site) needs to be online and accessible, without any DNS changes, and with working server credentials.

Your destination site (the site at the new server) should not yet be using the original site’s domain or have the DNS changed.

The destination site should use another URL or a temporary/staging URL, and the domain should be pointed to the new site only after the migration is done.

How to Start

Set up SSH/SFTP/FTP credentials on your current site

Cloning is only available if you’ve added SSH, SFTP, or FTP credentials to your WordPress.com dashboard. If you’re not seeing this option, check that you have working credentials for the site with the backups you’re using to clone.

For more information on finding and adding your credentials, read our documentation.

adding SSH/SFTP credentials to Jetpack
Jetpack credentials page.

Choose and set up your new hosting plan 

  1. Ensure your new host plan meets (or, better yet, exceeds) the minimum WordPress requirements.
  2. Ensure that your new host has adequate resources for your specific site, including disk space, bandwidth, memory, and CPU. Not sure what you need? This article can help you figure it out.
  3. You need a working WordPress install at the new host. Since we do not back up WordPress’ core files, you will need a working WordPress installation to perform a clone restore.

Note: While not necessary, a fresh WordPress installation is highly recommended. This is because the clone/migration process will not delete any files currently on the WordPress site.

Prepare for migration

It’s important to migrate when you aren’t planning to publish any new content. You might lose that data if you create new content during the migration. It’s also a good idea to do the entire process when your site isn’t too busy, so there’s minimal interruption to visitors. This time will be unique for every website but may mean that it’s best done over the weekend or late at night. 

Jetpack’s clone feature transfers WordPress and its data to a new server but will not transfer other data such as email accounts. If you have email set up with your old hosting provider, now might be a good time to migrate this to a dedicated email host (like G Suite or Microsoft 365), which typically offers more features than standard hosting email. At the very least, make sure you have a plan for any email accounts you have set up.

Before you start, there are a few things you’ll need on hand:

  • SSH/SFTP/FTP credentials for your new web host.
  • The login for your DNS host. This will usually be your domain name provider but could also be a standalone DNS provider such as Cloudflare.
  • The DNS records for your new server. This will usually be the server IP address you can find from your hosting provider.

Let’s get cloning

Jetpack Backup screen asking for a destination site title and URL
Getting started screen.

Start the cloning process from your WordPress.com account for your site. Please note that the cloning feature is not currently available on cloud.jetpack.com.

Screenshot of the Clone uption under Site tools: "Clone: Clone your existing site and all its data to a new location" 

Other option listed is "Manage your connection"
Clone option under Site tools
  1. Go to SettingsGeneral.
  2. Scroll to the Site Tools section at the bottom and select Clone.
  3. This page will show you some basic information about your website. If it’s all correct, click Continue.
  4. Enter your destination site title and destination site URL. This is the new host you’re cloning to — in most cases, you’ll need to enter your temporary/staging URL rather than your original site’s domain name as you’ll point your original domain’s DNS records to the site after cloning has finished. If you are updating your URL, enter the new URL. Click Continue.
  5. Enter your new server credentials, which we spoke about earlier. Jetpack will use these to clone your site from your current host to your new host. If you’re unsure, check with your host for the right information.
  6. Enter the destination WordPress path. This is where your site’s files should be stored and is probably something like /public_html. If you’re unsure, your new host should be able to provide this information. Click Save.
  7. Select Clone’s current state to use the most recent backup. Or choose Clone’s previous state to choose an earlier backup. If you choose the latter, you’ll be taken to your activity log to select an appropriate clone point. Click Yep! Begin cloning to kick off the copy process.
  8. You’ll see a confirmation screen that allows you to return to the site’s activity log. Click To the Activity Log! to follow the progress.
Confirmation screen.

Test the cloned site

To check if your migration was successful, it’s useful to check the website before pointing your domain name to the new host. Ensure that content is loading as expected and all functionality works properly. This isn’t a step to rush. Be thorough and take your time. 

There are a few ways to do this:

  1. Use a proxy service such as hosts.cx. This super simple way to test works on nearly every operating system. Simply enter your new server IP address and the website domain name (be careful here — ensure everything is correct, including www vs. non-www).
  2. Change your host file. This file sits on your computer and allows you to point a domain name to a different IP address. The process changes depending on your operating system. Click here for more information.

Point your domain name to your new host

Once satisfied that the migration was successful, you’ll need to change your DNS settings to point your domain name to your new server. The specific process for this depends on your provider, but here are the typical steps:

  1. Log in to your domain registrar or DNS provider and locate the area to update your DNS settings. Again, this will vary based on your provider, but they should supply clear documentation.
  2. Change the A record to your new server IP address. The exact steps depend on your provider, but domain.com has a great example. You can also always ask your provider to make this change for you. Important: Don’t remove, edit, or delete any other DNS settings unless you are certain you no longer need them. 
  3. Once you’ve saved your settings, you must wait for the DNS to propagate. DNS changes can take up to 48 hours to update around the world. For this reason, it’s important not to immediately cancel your old hosting until you’re confident that propagation has finished. You can verify propagation with tools such as DNS Checker.

After migrating your site, you’ll be prompted to log in to the copied version. For that, use the WP-Admin username and password for the site you copied from. The cloning process overwrites everything, including the WP Admin user information.

Important: After logging in to the new site, the Jetpack Safe Mode prompt will be shown everywhere on the dashboard. More information about Safe mode is here.

FAQ and Troubleshooting

Do I need to update any URLs in my database after cloning the site?

No, the cloning process automatically updates all of your site’s URLs.

The option to clone the site isn’t showing up

To clone your site, the Jetpack connection to your current site needs to be working properly, and you need to have added SFTP, FTP, or SSH credentials to the settings page for the site that you going to clone from (the site connected to your Jetpack plan).

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

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SSH, SFTP, FTPS, and FTP Credentials

SSH, SFTP, FTPS, and FTP credentials allow Jetpack and the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin to perform restores. They can also be used to connect backups when the initial connection doesn’t work. These credentials also allow Jetpack users with a Jetpack Scan plan to fix threats found in security scans.

Jetpack VaultPress Backup is the backup solution provisioned for all new Jetpack plans that include backups.

What are SSH, SFTP, FTPS, and FTP credentials?

Every site is hosted on a server – this is where the files, directories, programs, and services that make up your site are located.

SSH (Secure Shell), SFTP (SSH File Transfer Protocol), FTPS (a.k.a FTP-SSL, and FTP Secure), and FTP (File Transfer Protocol) are different types of server credentials. These credentials allow you, or a service like Jetpack VaultPress Backup, to directly access the server that’s powering your website.

SSH, SFTP, and FTPS establish secure server connections, whereas FTP does not, and for that reason, it is not recommended if SSH or SFTP is available.

Server credentials are unique and different from:

  • Your WordPress.org login
  • Your WP Admin login
  • Your WordPress.com login
  • Your host’s control panel or dashboard login

SSH, SFTP, FTPS, and FTP credentials provide a way to transfer files from one host to another. The manner in which this happens is different for each method:

File Access Permission

Note that when creating new SFTP/SSH credentials to use with Jetpack VaultPress Backup, you need to set the correct access permissions (full read and write access) to the WordPress directory.

File access permissions are a set of instructions that dictate who can access and modify WordPress files and folders. 

It is important to set the correct permissions to your WordPress install to allow Jetpack VaultPress Backup to back up your files (read access) and restore the files (write access).

The required settings could vary depending on your host, so we can’t provide the exact permissions you’ll need. 

Your hosting provider can help with this, and they may even provide instructions in their support documentation.

Why does Jetpack need them?

We need credentials in order to restore your files and data. We can also use these to connect for backups if the Jetpack connection isn’t working. It is by far the most efficient and reliable way to back up the potentially large amounts of data involved with running a site.

Note: We will never use these credentials for anything other than backups and restores without asking your permission first.

Which credential type do you recommend?

We recommend SSH, as it’s the most robust, secure, and efficient. Please note that currently, only unencrypted private keys are supported, which means keys without a password or passphrase.

If your host doesn’t allow SSH access, we recommend SFTP as the next best option as it provides some security beyond what FTP offers. If you can’t get either, FTP will also work.

Note: We do support FTPS protocol, but we do not recommend it since it is a deprecated protocol.

Where do I find these credentials?

Your host provides these credentials for you. You will often receive these details via email when you first create a hosting account.

You can often find these credentials by referring to your host’s documentation. You can also contact them directly and they’ll point you in the right direction.

How do I add server credentials?

You can learn how to add server credentials to your site by following the directions on these pages:

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

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Adding Credentials in the Jetpack Plugin

Looking for instructions on adding credentials to the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin? See our article about Adding Credentials to the Jetpack VaultPress Backup Plugin.

The steps below explain exactly how to get SSH, SFTP, or FTP credentials and enter them in your WordPress.com dashboard.

Jetpack VaultPress Backup will start to back up your site as soon as you purchase the product, provided Jetpack’s connection is working normally. If your backups don’t start right away, you can add SSH, SFTP, or FTP credentials to bypass other issues and create a backup immediately. Credentials are also needed to restore your site from a previous backup.

File Access Permissions

File access permissions are a set of instructions that dictate who can access and modify WordPress files and folders. When creating new SFTP/SSH credentials to use with Jetpack VaultPress Backup, you need to set the correct access permissions (full read and write access) to the WordPress directory. It is important to set the correct permissions to your WordPress install to allow your Jetpack VaultPress Backup to back up your files (read access), upload the helper script, and restore files (write access).

Note: The required settings could vary depending on your host, so we can’t provide the exact permissions you’ll need. Your hosting provider can help with this, and they may even provide instructions in their support documentation.

ℹ️ What is Helper Script?

The Helper Script is used to fetch data from your site efficiently. It can walk directory trees, hash files, fetch WordPress config information, and fetch database tables. They expire automatically 6 hours after being uploaded to the server. They’re unique to the server that uploaded them, and only that server can access them due to randomly generated keys only the uploading server knows about.

Getting Server Credentials for Jetpack VaultPress Backup

If you’re confused about what these credentials are, how they work, or why we need them, you can read more about that in our SSH, SFTP, FTP Credentials guide.

If you have issues adding your credentials to Jetpack VaultPress Backup, we recommend contacting your hosting provider for support. When you reach out to your hosting provider, you can share the following with them:

I’m in the process of setting up my site on VaultPress Backup, and I need server credentials to enter into the plugin so that it can perform backups and restores on my website. Could you help me determine the correct information for the following items:

  • Protocol: FTP is fine, but SSH or SFTP would be ideal.
  • User: The user needs to have read and write permissions for my site’s files on the server. More on why VaultPress Backup needs read and write permissions can be found here.
  • Password: If using SSH credentials, this password is optional.
  • Host/IP Address: If my site uses Cloudflare, I require the IP address for the server my site is located on, otherwise the URL that points to my site on the server is fine.
  • Port: Should the port be 21, 22 or something else?
  • SSH Private Key: If using SSH, the SSH private key cannot be password protected and must use OpenSSH format. Password protected private keys and/or keys in PuTTY format are not supported.
  • WordPress Path: The WordPress path should point to the folder on the server where my WordPress instance lives.

Add Your Credentials

To add your server credentials:

  1. Go to WordPress.com.
  2. In the top left corner, click Switch Site and select the Jetpack-connected site you want to add server credentials to.
  3. Go to Settings → Jetpack.
  4. In the screen that opens, you’ll see the option to select from a list of popular hosting providers. Click on your hosting provider if listed. If you don’t know your hosting provider, it’s not listed here, or you have your server credentials, click I don’t know / my host is not listed here / I have my server credentials.
  1. On the next screen, you’ll enter your credentials and click Test and save credentials. Once the site is connected, Jetpack will start your first backup.

Note: If your site is hosted at Pressable, we can automatically detect these credentials for you. In that case, you will see a message asking for your approval to grant Jetpack permission to use credentials to back up your site.

Entering Your Credentials

The information below explains what to enter into each field, based on the type of credentials you’re adding.

Adding FTP Credentials

To use FTP credentials, you’ll need the following information: 

  • Credential type: This will be FTP
  • Server address: This is often your site URL, but some hosts require you to use a different, special domain or an IP address. Note: If you’re using Cloudflare with your website, you will always need to use the server’s IP address where your site is located.
  • Port Number: This will be 21.
  • WordPress installation path: This should point to the directory on your server where your WordPress installation is located.
  • Server username: This username should have read and write access to your WordPress directory.
  • Server password: Try to make sure this password is secure and is different from other passwords you use. If you’re unsure about your password strength, read this article on Selecting a Strong Password.

If you are unsure about any of this information, contact your hosting provider for assistance.

Adding SFTP/SSH Credentials

Typically, SFTP setup coincides with SSH activation on your server. However, in the case of some hosts, it is possible to create a standalone SFTP account that is unrelated to SSH.

To use SFTP/SSH credentials, you’ll need the following information: 

  • Credential type: This will be SFTP/SSH
  • Server address: This is often your site URL, but some hosts require you to use a different, special domain or an IP address. Note: If you’re using Cloudflare with your website, you will always need to use the server’s IP address where your site is located.
  • Port Number: This is typically 22. Double-check with your hosting provider to ensure you have the right one.
  • WordPress installation path: This should point to the directory on your server where your WordPress installation is located.
  • Server username: This username should have read and write access to your WordPress directory.
  • Server password: Try to make sure this password is secure and is different from other passwords you use. If you’re unsure about your password strength, read this article on Selecting a Strong Password.

If you are unsure about any of this information, contact your hosting provider for assistance.

Adding SSH Credentials with Private Key

​​To use SSH, you’ll need to first generate a private/public key pair on your server. Once you’ve done that, copy the private key and add it to a text file somewhere on your computer. 

​​To use SFTP credentials, you’ll need the following information: 

  • Credential type: This will be SFTP/SSH
  • Server address: This is often your site URL, but some hosts require you to use a different, special domain or an IP address. Note: If you’re using Cloudflare with your website, you will always need to use the server’s IP address where your site is located.
  • Port Number: This will be 22 or 18765 for SSH. Double-check with your hosting provider to ensure you have the right one.
  • WordPress installation path: This should point to the directory on your server where your WordPress installation is located.
  • Server username: This username should have read and write access to your WordPress directory.
  • Server password: This field is optional if you’re using a private key. If you enter one, Jetpack will try the private key and the password both. Try to make sure this password is secure and is different from other passwords you use. If you’re unsure about your password strength, read this article on Selecting a Strong Password.
  • SSH Private key: Make sure that it is not password protected and using OpenSSH/RSA format. Password protected private keys and/or keys in PuTTY format are not supported.

If you are unsure about any of this information, contact your hosting provider for assistance.

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

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Manually Restore a VaultPress Backup

The manual restore process allows you to use your backups from Jetpack or Jetpack VaultPress Backup to restore your WordPress site to any host on any server anywhere. 

Have you tried an automatic restore?

Jetpack and Jetpack VaultPress Backup make restoring your site as easy as clicking a button.

Restoring with the Jetpack Plugin | Restoring with the Jetpack VaultPress Backup Plugin

How to do a manual restore?

Note: Jetpack Support Scope doesn’t cover manual restores. If you need further assistance, please contact your hosting support for help.

  1. Before you can restore your WordPress data, you will need to ensure that WordPress is installed and functioning on your server.
  2. Go to the Activity Log for your site.
    • For users with the Jetpack plugin, this means logging in to your WordPress.com dashboard and going to Jetpack → Activity Log
    • For users with the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin, this means going to cloud.jetpack.com → Activity Log.
  3. Locate the backup you would like to download. You can do this by using the filters at the top of the Activity Log.
  4. Download the backup.
    • For users with the full-featured Jetpack plugin, you’ll click Download.
    • For users with the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin, you’ll click Actions and then Download backup.
  5. The backup that will download will be a compressed file with a .tar.gz file extension. To open this file you will need to unzip it. On Mac OS you can simply double-click the file. In Windows, you can use an archiving tool such as 7-Zip. The resulting folder will contain your data, divided into the following sub-folders: wp-content and sql. The wp-content folder contains these sub-folders: plugins, themes, and uploads.
  6. Your plugins, themes, and uploads folders can be transferred via FTP or a File Manager tool to the wp-content folders on your WordPress site.
  7. The SQL folder contains several .sql files, each representing a database table. For example, the wp_posts table will be represented by the wp_posts.sql file. You can import your .sql files into your MySQL database in a few different ways. It’s easiest to use something like phpMyAdmin or a desktop tool like Sequel Pro. If you have direct access to MySQL via the command line, you can run the following command:
mysql --user="username" --password="password" --hostname="mysql.yoursite.com" database_name < file_name.sql
  1. If you’re restoring to an empty database, it’s often easier to join the .sql files into a single file.
    • In OS X: Launch Terminal.app and run the following command: cat *.sql > backup_db.sql
    • In Windows: Use the command prompt and run the following command: copy /b *.sql newfile.sql

You may see 2 files for each table in the sql folder: something like wp_posts.sql and wp_posts-updates.sql. If you are importing one-by-one, you should do the primary table first (wp_posts.sql) then the table labeled -updates.  If you’ve concatenated them all together as explained in step 7, there’s no need to worry about this.

Manually Restoring Your Site to a New Domain

When restoring your site to a new domain, you’ll need to update the siteurl and home values in your wp_options table. You can either edit the SQL (.sql) export file, or import the SQL and edit your database using phpMyAdmin or a desktop tool like Sequel Pro shown below.

Your host usually can also help with this step.

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Jetpack Rewind

Jetpack VaultPress Backup

Never lose a word, image, page, or time worrying about your site. Use Jetpack VaultPress Backup to automatically create backups, and easily restore or migrate your site.

Jetpack VaultPress Backup allows you to easily restore or download a backup of your site from a specific moment in time. It’s like having a powerful undo button for your WordPress. 

How do I get Jetpack VaultPress Backup?

Jetpack VaultPress Backup is available to users who have purchased a Jetpack VaultPress Backup plan or the Jetpack Security or Complete bundles.

If you want to use Jetpack VaultPress Backup and have an existing Jetpack plan that uses VaultPress for backups, we can manually convert your site from VaultPress to the enhanced Jetpack VaultPress Backup. Contact us directly, and we’ll make that happen!

Note: Once the site is connected to Jetpack VaultPress Backup, your site will remain on the Jetpack VaultPress Backup solution if you change your Jetpack plan type to any other plan that includes backups, or if you move your site to a new host.

How do I use Jetpack VaultPress Backup?

Jetpack VaultPress Backup can be used via our two plugins that include backup functionality, Jetpack, and Jetpack VaultPress Backup. You can learn more about how to use Jetpack VaultPress Backup via the different plugins from the articles below.

Backups via the Jetpack Plugin

Jetpack VaultPress Backup can be used via the Jetpack plugin that you already know and love. These support articles go over how to get the most out of your backups via the Jetpack plugin:

Backups via the Jetpack VaultPress Backup Plugin

If you’re looking for a plugin that just does backups, the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin is for you! These support articles go over how to use the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin:

These support articles go over topics that are helpful when using Jetpack VaultPress Backup:

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Restore with the Jetpack Plugin

Looking for restore instructions for the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin? See our article about Restoring with the Jetpack VaultPress Backup Plugin.

Restore from a backup in just a few clicks.

Jetpack VaultPress Backup is available to users who have purchased the Jetpack VaultPress Backup solution. It is also the backup solution that is provided for any new Jetpack Security or Jetpack Complete plan purchase.

There are 3 different ways to restore your site:

  1. Restore your site to a particular event;
  2. Restore your site to a particular day;
  3. Download a backup and restore it manually.

Before You Restore

In order to restore with Jetpack VaultPress Backup, you will need to have server credentials added to your Settings.

Restore Your Site to a Particular Event

  1. Go to WordPress.com.
  2. Open your Activity Log.
  3. Use the filters to search by Date Range and/or Activity Type you’d like to restore.
  1. Click Restore to open the restore site dialog box.
  1. Uncheck any boxes for items that you don’t wish to restore. If you want to restore everything, leave all of the boxes checked and click Confirm Restore.
  • The options to restore are:
    • WordPress Themes
    • WordPress Plugins
    • Media Uploads
    • WordPress Root (includes wp-config.php and any non-WordPress files)
    • WP-Content Directory (excluding themes, plugins, and updates)
    • Site Database (SQL)
  1. Your restore to the specific point in time you have selected will begin. At the top of the Activity Log, you can follow the progress of the restore. You will also receive email updates on the progress of your restore.
  1. When the restore has been completed, you’ll see a confirmation message. Click View site to see your site restored to the event that you selected.

Restore Your Site to a Particular Day

  1. Go to WordPress.com.
  2. Navigate to Jetpack → Backup. You’ll see the latest backup for your site or the scheduled time of your next backup if a backup has not yet been completed today.
  1. Use the navigation bar to find the day you want to restore to. Each day will show the time of the latest backup for that day, along with any changes included in that backup.
  1. When you find the day you want, click Restore to this point to open the restore site dialog box.
  1. Uncheck any boxes for items you don’t wish to restore. If you want to restore everything, leave all of the boxes checked and click Confirm restore.
  1. Your restore will begin, and a progress bar will appear on the page. You will also receive email updates on the progress of your restore.
  1. When the restore has been completed, you’ll see a confirmation message. Click View your website to see your site restored to the day you selected.

Download a Backup for manual restore

  1. Go to WordPress.com. 
  2. Open your Activity Log.
  3. Use the filters to search by Date Range and/or Activity Type you’d like to restore.
  1. Click Download to open the create the downloadable backup box. 
  1. Uncheck any boxes for items you don’t want to include in your download. If you want to download everything, leave all of the boxes checked and click Create download.
  1. Jetpack will begin preparing your selected download. At the top of the Activity Log, you can follow the progress of your download.
  1. A message will appear at the top of the Activity Log when your backup download is ready. Click Download to download the backup. You will also receive an email with a link to the download when it’s complete.

Once you have downloaded the backup, you can use that to restore the site manually if you wish.

FAQ

Can I perform a one-click restore even if my site is down or has a fatal error?

No, if your site is not reachable or is showing a fatal error, you need to proceed with a manual restore.

Jetpack VaultPress Backup one-click restore requires a working WordPress install; in case you want to proceed with the one-click restore, you need a fresh WordPress install, reinstall and reconnect Jetpack and then run the restore.

Does restoring with Jetpack VaultPress Backup delete files from my server?

No. When we restore your site, we don’t delete files. Files with the same name will be overwritten, but uniquely-named files are not removed. We only delete our helper files, which we add to the site during the restore process.

However, it is important to note that your site’s database is completely replaced with the database from the backup you’re restoring from. So, any posts or pages you’ve added since the restore point date would be lost. You should make an export of this content before using our restore feature; then, you can import it back to your site after the restore.

How long does it take to restore?

This depends on many factors, such as the size of your site and the type of server credentials you’ve added to Jetpack. Generally, SFTP and SSH credentials provide a faster connection.

You can check the restore progress by going to My Site(s) → Jetpack → Activity Log. You should also receive an email once the restore has finished.


Get help

Have questions? Feel free to contact support for more personalized assistance.

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Activity Log in the Jetpack Plugin

Looking for information about the Activity Log in the Jetpack VaultPress Backup plugin? See our article about the Activity Log in the Jetpack VaultPress Backup Plugin.

The Activity Log shows a full list of management events that have occurred on your site. For general features and FAQs, please see our information page.

Types of Activities Recorded

The events stored in your site’s activity log include:

  • Brute Force Attack Protection
  • Login attempts by registered site users.
  • Published or updated posts and pages.
  • Comment submission and management activity.
  • Plugin installations, updates, and removals.
  • Theme installations, updates, and deletions.
  • Settings and options modifications.
  • See the complete list.

Viewing Your Site’s Activity Log

Customers on the Jetpack Backup Daily plan will have access to events for the last 30 days, and customers on the Jetpack Backup Real-time plan will see events for 1 (one) year. For Jetpack Backup Real-time plans, a maximum of 1,000 events will show on the feed, but you can filter the events by date range and activity type and the feed will show up to 1,000 events from that filtered range as well. 

To view your site’s activity:

  1. Go to WordPress.com
  2. Click My Sites in the top left corner. Select the Jetpack-connected site for which you’d like to see recent activity. (Note that you’ll only be able to view Activity for sites on which you are an Administrator. Editor role and below cannot view Activity.)
  3. Click Jetpack → Activity Log on the left menu. You’ll now be able to view the recent events recorded for your site.

Filtering Events

If your site has a paid plan, you’ll see a Filter by option at the top of your activity, where you can customize your results. You can currently filter events by Date Range and Activity Type.

To filter by date range:

  1. Select Date Range
  2. Select the start date.
  3. Select the end date.
  4. Click Apply.

To filter by activity type:

  1. Select Activity Type.
  2. Select the checkbox next to each activity type you want to display.
  3. Click Apply.

For an even greater level of customization, Date Range and Activity Type filters can be combined.

To clear an individual filter, click the X next to it. To clear all active filters, click the larger X icon on the right.

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

Privacy Information

This feature is activated by default. There is currently no way to deactivate this feature.

Data Used
Site Owners / Users

To deliver this functionality and record activities around site management, the following information is captured: user email address, user role, user login, user display name, WordPress.com and local user IDs, the activity to be recorded, the WordPress.com-connected site ID of the site on which the activity takes place, the site’s Jetpack version, and the timestamp of the activity. Some activities may also include the actor’s IP address (login attempts, for example) and user agent.

Site Visitors

None.

Activity Tracked
Site Owners / Users

Recorded site management activities include: login attempts/actions, post and page update and publish actions, comment/pingback submission and management actions, plugin and theme management actions, widget updates, user management actions, and the modification of other various site settings and options. See Complete List.

Site Visitors

None.

Data Synced (Read More)
Site Owners / Users

All core WordPress and Jetpack option/setting update actions are synced. This includes the current and previous state of a site’s options. Successful and failed login attempts (these include IP address and user agent) are synced.

Site Visitors

Successful and failed login attempts, which will include the actor’s IP address and user agent.

Data Retention for Current Plan Offerings

The retention periods for activity log data depend on both the activity itself and the site’s plan. This table covers the retention periods for the plans currently available on our plans page.

ActivityFreeBackup 10 GB, SecurityBackup 1TB, Complete
Attachments: uploads, updates, deletions30 days30 Days1 Year
Comments: submissions, approvals, un-approvals, content edits, deletions, trash actions, spam/un-spam actions, restorations from trash30 days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: plan activations/deactivations1 year1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: site connections/disconnections1 year1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: user link/unlink actions1 Year1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: downtime monitoring status changes1 Year1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: Contact Form submissions30 Days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: feature activations and deactivations30 Days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Jetpack Social actions*30 Days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: option additions and updates30 Days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Brute Force Attack Protection recovery email sends*30 Days30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Backup — credentials updated or deleted1 Year1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: Backup — backup complete, full backup complete, initial backup complete, backup error, successful restore actions, failed restore actions, scan result finds and fixes, restore download ready*30 Days30 Days**1 Year**
Menus: additions, updates, deletions30 Days30 Days1 Year
Pingbacks: receipts, approvals, un-approvals, deletions, trash actions, spam/un-spam actions, restorations from trash30 Days30 Days1 Year
Plugins: updates, autoupdates, updates made available30 Days30 Days1 Year
Plugins: installations, activations, network activations, deactivations, network deactivations, edits, deletions, failed deletions, failed updates30 Days30 Days1 Year
Posts: publish actions, updates, deletions, trash actions, imports, exports*30 Days30 Days1 Year
Terms(?): additions, updates, deletions*30 Days30 Days1 Year
Themes: updates, updates made available30 Days30 Days1 Year
Themes: installations, edits, deletions, switches, network enable/disable actions30 Days30 Days1 Year
Users: login and logout actions30 Days30 Days1 Year
Users: additions, deletions, network deletions, registrations, invite acceptance, removals, updates, invitations30 Days30 Days1 Year
Widgets: additions, updates, removals, reorders, set-to-inactive actions30 Days30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: updates, network updates, updates made available30 Days30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: autoupdates, re-installations30 Days30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: option additions and updates30 Days30 Days1 Year

Data Retention for Previous Plan Offerings

The retention periods for activity log data depend on both the activity itself and the site’s plan. This table covers the retention periods for the plans that you may currently be using, but are no longer available for purchase via Jetpack.com.

ActivityPersonal, PremiumProfessionalBackup Daily, Scan Daily, Security DailyBackup Realtime, Security Realtime, Complete
Attachments: uploads, updates, deletions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Comments: submissions, approvals, un-approvals, content edits, deletions, trash actions, spam/un-spam actions, restorations from trash30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: plan activations/deactivations1 YearUnlimited1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: site connections/disconnections1 YearUnlimited1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: user link/unlink actions1 YearUnlimited1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: downtime monitoring status changes1 YearUnlimited1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: Contact Form submissions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: feature activations and deactivations30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Jetpack Social actions*30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: option additions and updates30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Brute Force Attack Protection recovery email sends*30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Jetpack: Backup — credentials updated or deleted1 YearUnlimited1 Year1 Year
Jetpack: Backup — backup complete, full backup complete, initial backup complete, backup error, successful restore actions, failed restore actions, scan result finds and fixes, restore download ready*30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Menus: additions, updates, deletions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Pingbacks: receipts, approvals, un-approvals, deletions, trash actions, spam/un-spam actions, restorations from trash30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Plugins: updates, autoupdates, updates made available30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Plugins: installations, activations, network activations, deactivations, network deactivations, edits, deletions, failed deletions, failed updates30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Posts: publish actions, updates, deletions, trash actions, imports, exports*30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Terms(?): additions, updates, deletions*30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Themes: updates, updates made available30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Themes: installations, edits, deletions, switches, network enable/disable actions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Users: login and logout actions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Users: additions, deletions, network deletions, registrations, invite acceptance, removals, updates, invitations30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
Widgets: additions, updates, removals, reorders, set-to-inactive actions30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: updates, network updates, updates made available30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: autoupdates, re-installations30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year
WordPress Core: option additions and updates30 DaysUnlimited30 Days1 Year

* Activity present in a site’s activity log but not currently shown to the site owner in the UI.

** Subject to your usage and storage limit. Learn more.

NOTE: at the end of any retention periods outlined above, activity data is moved to long-term storage and is retained indefinitely. Once in long-term storage, activity data will no longer be visible in a site’s activity log.

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Security Features

Jetpack includes state-of-the-art security tools that keep your site safe and sound, from posts to plugins.

Jetpack’s security features include:

  • Downtime Monitoring - Jetpack Monitor will keep tabs on your site, and alert you the moment that downtime is detected.
  • WordPress.com Secure Sign On - Using the same log-in credentials you use for WordPress.com, you’ll now be able to register for and sign in to self-hosted WordPress.org sites quickly and securely.
  • Security - Jetpack includes state-of-the-art security tools that keep your site safe and sound, from posts to plugins. Protection from brute force attacks24/7 downtime monitoringSecure Sign-OnAutomatic plugin updatesAnd more Are you blocked from accessing your dashboard? Use one of the three methods described here to unblock yourself. Here are some resources to help get you started: Our […]
  • Troubleshooting issues with the Brute Force Attack Protection feature - Are you unable to enable the Protect feature on your site? Check these tips to find out why.
  • Jetpack Scan - Jetpack Scan offers automated malware scanning and one-click threat resolution.
  • Brute Force Attack Protection (formerly Protect) - Jetpack Protect allows you to protect yourself against traditional brute force attacks and distributed brute force attacks that use many servers against your site
  • Jetpack Firewall - The Jetpack Firewall is a web application firewall (known as WAF) designed to protect your WordPress site from malicious requests. Looking for more information about Firewall included with the Jetpack Protect plugin? See our article about the Jetpack Protect Plugin. The Jetpack Firewall examines incoming traffic to a WP site and decides to allow or […]
  • Jetpack Protect - Jetpack Protect is a free security plugin for WordPress that scans your site and warns you about vulnerabilities, keeping your site one step ahead of security threats and malware. What do I need to run Jetpack Protect on my site? Installing Jetpack Protect Installing Jetpack Protect can be done from your site’s WP Admin. To […]
  • Jetpack Firewall in the Jetpack Protect Plugin - Jetpack Firewall examines incoming traffic to your site and decides to allow or block it based on various rules. This adds an important layer of protection to your site, particularly when attackers actively exploit unpatched vulnerabilities.  The Firewall Premium features require a connection to a WordPress.com account and a plan that has a Scan feature, […]

Are you blocked from accessing your dashboard?

Use one of the three methods described here to unblock yourself.

Troubleshooting

What else should I do to protect my sites?

Backups

It’s strongly recommended you back up your self-hosted sites using a tool such as Jetpack Backup. Backups provide a recovery mechanism should a malicious file corrupt your site or become otherwise compromised.

Plugin Updates

Jetpack’s automatic plugin updates make it easy to keep your plugins up to date. By setting your plugins to auto-update, you help ensure any issues that may arise due to plugins with malicious code will not harm your site.

Keeping your plugins and themes updated is one of the most effective ways to keep your self-hosted WordPress sites secure. By using Jetpack’s site management tools, you can keep your plugins up to date from one easy control panel in WordPress.com. Learn more about automatic plugin updates»

Site Monitoring

Jetpack’s downtime monitoring feature will keep tabs on your site and alert you the moment downtime is detected. Monitoring uptime of your site can be an important tool in the security of your site. Learn more about downtime monitoring»

Still need help?

Please contact support directly. We’re happy to lend a hand and answer any other questions that you may have.

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